ROOMS FOR LIVING

26th May 2020

Andree Putman, an extraordinary lady, who, among other things, decorated Concorde, said “Objects must talk to each other” and also “..to not dare is to have already lost”. Architecturally, a lovely example is the Sydney Opera House.

The largest of my three rooms must accommodate a kitchen area, a table, a desk, a TV and sitting area, a bookcase and an entrance -it is crowded.
Also, the light comes in at one end through floor to ceiling doors over a narrow balcony which overlooks a tin-roofed brick wall. Not prepossessing! However the balcony is softened with pots of plants.
In the mornings that end of the room is flooded with warm sunshine and glorious light. Therefore that is where a breakfast table and two very practical chairs live.

From the entrance the whole room needs to be visible. This avoids it being broken up vertically and hence invites one to enter and move towards the light. The room is expanded.

All the top surfaces have objects on them, sometimes they talk, but mostly they argue – they are an eclectic gathering and they move around a lot. This irregular re-arranging keeps the room interesting. I engage more with my home. It assumes the organic model that nothing is permanent and that change represents life.

 

8th May 2020

Most people know when a room looks and feels good.
What they often don’t know is why.

Over the coming months I intend to offer my reasons as to why a room ‘works’.

I should tell you now that my colleagues in the antique world dubbed me “Primary Colour Peter” because at fairs I often backed plinths with a strong coloured fabric drop.

I believe in colour: muted greys on white, all flooded with light, is not an environment conducive to rest, or contemplation, or anything other than the need to clean it.

Pristine, immaculate and perfectly arranged rooms have no room for anything else, including you. That is the perfect way to camouflage your own personality.

Most of us, however, if not quite content with ourselves, have at least come to terms and attempt to provide a comfortable personal space – a living room.

I live in a three room flat, so my living room is divided into practical areas. In the coming weeks I will tell you why it is as it is.